Buy Boats, Sell Boats, Review Boats

Posted by on Apr 5, 2013 in Fishing |

Fishing Friday: Is it Time to Get New Line?

Now that fishing season is on the horizon, it’s time for a little spring-time tackle prep. Start off by replacing your fishing line... all of your line.

I could start this off by telling you to check the fishing line on each and every one of your reels for nicks and chafing; I could suggest that you replace all line that’s more than three seasons old; I could inquire as whether you had break-offs last fall that lead you to believe that your line might be in need of replacement. But the truth of the matter is that if I did, you might lose a trophy fish this spring because you missed one little nick or twist. Having fresh, strong line is so imperative that you should spare no expense, ignore all other factors, and simply put fresh monofilament or braid fishing line on all of your reels each and every spring.

fishing line on reel

Is every inch of that fishing line on your reel in tip-top shape? If not, replace it. If so, replace it anyway.

Yeah, yeah, I know. You have 20 or 30 rods and reels, and this will cost an arm and a leg. It’ll take you hours. And you’ll have line-burns on your fingers by the time you get them all done. Tough luck. You’re a die-hard, dedicated angler, right? You signed up for this stuff. So quit your whining, and follow the process.

Step I: Go to your local K-Mart or Wal-mart, and complain because they don’t have the specific pound-test you need in the brand you like most.

Step II: Go to the tackle shop, and complain because their prices are twice as high as K-Mart or Wal-Mart.

Step III: Return home with six shopping bags full of fishing line. After you shred the receipt, carefully remove and shred the price tags from each and every spool to prevent your wife from figuring out you just withdrew $3,765 from the kid’s college fund to pay for 10,000 yards of fishing line.

Step IV: Spend every free hour of the next two weeks pulling old line off your reels, and winding new line back on.

Step V: Go out and hook a trophy fish. Revel in the knowledge that every inch of your line is in tip-top shape, until the fish swims by the prop and cuts your line on it. PS: now that your line has been dragged across the propeller, it could be nicked or chafed elsewhere and needs complete replacement. Fortunately, you know the drill.