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Posted by on Apr 30, 2009 in Boat Show, UK, US |

Schock Steps it Up to a Harbor 30

Tom could stand up in the 25; the new 30 is for the rest of us.

Tom Schock at the helm of a Harbor 25.

Tom Schock at the helm of a Harbor 25.

Tom Schock is relatively short, modest, and unassuming, and the sailboats he builds have been in a similar vein…the canting-keel Schock 40 being the only exception I can think of offhand. The W.D. Schock Corporation started in Southern California in 1946, before fiberglass boatbuilding had begun, and has survived nearly every company that flourished in the boom times.

As always, I enjoyed seeing Tom at the recent show in Oakland, where he was showing the Harbor 25 and Harbor 20, and I was reminded that despite appearances, Tom makes an enthusiastic case for his products. The 20-footer is a daysailer and racer that’s spread far beyond Newport Harbor, California, the harbor it was originally designed to energize. Tom said he thought selling 15 would be success when he and his brother Steve put the boat together as a Newport Harbor Yacht Club project in 1998. Today, they’re building 20 to 30 boats a year and have sold more than 150 on Newport Harbor alone.

The Harbor 20, designed in 1998

The Harbor 20, designed in 1998

The Schocks put the Harbor 25 into their lineup in 2007, extending the concept of a classy, modestly priced daysailer to 25 feet to include a head and pocket-cruising capability. This model has also been successful, with over 30 sold, although they’ve had to change one innovative aspect…the 2-cycle gas-powered saildrive they first ran it with; now to meet California environmental regulations and increase international acceptance, they switched to a small Yanmar diesel last summer.

The Harbor 25, designed in 2007

The Harbor 25, designed in 2007

Now it’s time to move up to a Harbor 30, said Tom, allowing that it should be ready for Strictly Sail Chicago next winter. The boat will share the family Harbor styling, provide a head, like the 25, provide standing headroom (unlike the 25), and accommodations for four.

The boat's primary use will be as a daysailer, but it can sleep four.

The boat's primary use will be as a daysailer, but it can sleep four.

Looking at the profile, I would say they’ve done a good job of maintaining the traditional proportions of the Harbor line while still making the headroom significant. They’ve even fit in an aft double under the cockpit. Here’s a link to more info on the boat. Hopefully at this time next year, we can report on how Schock’s latest product sails and perhaps even sleeps.

—John Burnham

The Harbor 30 comes wheel-equipped and with easy sail controls of its smaller sisters.

The Harbor 30 comes wheel-equipped and with easy sail controls of its smaller sisters.

The moderate foils and sailplan promise good performance as well as good looks.

The moderate foils and sailplan promise good performance as well as good looks.