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Posted by on Apr 24, 2009 in Boat Show, UK, US | 1 comment

Launching at 43 Meters and 44 Feet: CRN & Catalina

Springtime is for boats to make splashes, large and small.

What’s getting launched across the world of boating this spring? Here are a few boats I’ve seen or received word about, starting with a big one!

At 43 meters (141'), the superyacht Sofico, built by CRN in Italy
At 43 meters (141′), the superyacht Sofico, built by CRN in Italy

Sofico, this luxury cruising vessel, was launched at a private event on April 9th at the Ancona, Italy, shipyard where CRN has been producing yachts since 1963 and been part of the Ferretti Group for the last decade. The big custom designs that CRN builds are constructed of steel or aluminum; Sofico is one of the yard’s smaller boats, the fourth in its series, and it’s a composite build that’s only semi-custom.

I imagine if you climb aboard, you won’t be able to tell that there’s anything else like it, however; I’ve learned that the interior features Art Deco motifs, precious woods, velvet couches and crocodile skin, among other surprises. The interior was conceived by long-time CRN partner, the Zuccon International Project Firm. CRN’s media rep has promised me interior photos sometime this summer. In the meantime, you can see more of the launching pictures in the CRN Gallery under “Events.”

The new Catalina 445 sits to the left of its older, larger sister, the 470.
The new Catalina 445 sits to the left of its older, larger sister, the 470.

I mentioned the new Catalina 445 last week, after I saw it (above) at the Strictly Sail Pacific & Power Expo in Oakland, California, and I promised a better photo of it. This was the best I could get, given how it was wedged into an L in the dock and beside the largest in Catalina’s Ocean series, the 470. While there’s a clear family resemblance, you can see that designer Gerry Douglas has given the boat clean lines and good freeboard forward; he told me that the waterline beam was a bit narrower, proportionately, as he’s trying to keep improving sailing performance. The interior has lots of great details, which we’ll cover in a later review. One neat innovation is an enlarged aft double to starboard that is oriented diagonally (below). Opposite on the port side, there’s a narrow cabin that has flip up/down bunks and the option of conversion to a workbench or storage area.

—John Burnham

The guest cabin, aft and to starboard, features extra space and a diagonally positioned double.
The guest cabin, aft and to starboard, features extra space and a diagonally positioned double.
Designer Gerry Douglas flips up the upper bunk in the smaller port cabin. A double berth can be created where he's standing, or, with the cockpit hatch up (as it is in the photo), a sailor can use this area to keep tools and work on projects.
Designer Gerry Douglas flips up the upper bunk in the smaller port cabin. A double berth can be created where he’s standing, or, with the cockpit hatch up (as it is in the photo), a sailor can use this area to keep tools and work on projects.

1 Comment

  1. omg this boat is huge!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!