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Posted by on Mar 2, 2009 in Environment, UK, US |

Where the Booby has Blue Feet, Unless They’re Red

The Galapagos Islands are not your everyday place to camp out on a boat. But it's well worth the trip.

A blue-footed booby greets the day on Espanola, an island in the Galapagos. Photo by Rachel Balaban/courtesy CruisingWorld.com.

A blue-footed booby greets the day on Espanola, an island in the Galapagos. Photo by Rachel Balaban/courtesy CruisingWorld.com.

Until the beginning of February, I was the Editor of Cruising World, and I went on an amazing trip with my wife last year to visit the Galapagos Islands with more than a dozen of the magazine’s readers. I offer this picture today to give you an idea of the remarkable animals that populate this amazing archipelago, which lies some 600 miles off the coast of Ecuador (and of which it is a part). I also wanted to invite you to have a look at the videos I shot, which despite some uneven quality in my camera work and more than a little procrastination on my part have emerged in pretty good shape on the Cruising World website thanks to the professional assistance I received from the magazine’s video production team. Here’s the link to where the videos are posted at the magazine’s website.

OK, I am certainly biased since I went there and wrote the story, but if you have ever had a thought about traveling there, I urge you to make the trip. It’s unlike any other place on earth and going on a charter there is, literally, like a voyage back through time.

You’ll also get close up to  the challenges faced in preserving the place’s spectacular biodiversity, and hopefully you’ll leave with a little bit more commitment to reducing the impact of  us humans on the other species on our planet as we go about our business on land and sea. If this interests you, check out the Galapagos Conservancy.

Just in case somebody is quizzing you, there are actually three kinds of booby in the Galapagos (not counting us tourists): blue-footed, red-footed, and nasca, which are black and white. And tomorrow, yup, we’ll get back to talking about boats.

John Burnham